Saturday, February 27, 2010

3000 Mile Service and Issaquah, Washington

I am approaching 3000 miles on the Triumph, and it was suggested by my dealer when I purchased the bike that I bring it in for an oil change at that interval, even though the manual technically doesn't call for any service until 6000 miles. I also wanted to have them check a bit of an intermittent squeak from the front brake area when I pushed the bike forward in the garage when parking it. So, last Saturday morning I brought my bike to I-90 Motorsports in Issaquah.

In this age of $19.95 oil changes for cars, it came as a surprise to me the cost of an oil service for my bike. All the Triumph dealers in the area charge about $130 for the service. I even called a local auto mechanic in North Bend who works on bikes in his spare time, and it looked like it would be near $100. A part of the cost is the synthetic oil and filter, but I still haven't really accepted the premium charge for this service. I think next time I will do this myself.
I was told the service would take about an hour, so I took the opportunity to walk around Issaquah with my camera. Right next to I-90 Motorsports is a drive-in restaurant that serves up burgers 1950's style, with a lot of music and motorsports paraphernalia. They also host a number of vintage car shows in their parking lot throughout the summer. I am not sure if this Buddy Holly Tour bus is a replica or the real thing, but it looks pretty cool, and is from the year of my birth:



Along Front Street stands a vintage Shell station - for many years this structure was very run down, but someone has renovated it quite nicely:




The Issaquah Creek meanders throughout town, and has been the source of some pretty significant flooding over the years, but today the creek looks quite tame:




I call this "getting your ducks in a row":


Other buildings have been renovated, and some public art has been added along Front Street:







I stop at a drive through espresso stand to have some coffee, right across from the Darigold milk processing plant, where a beautiful mural has been painted paying tribute to the early dairy industry:



By the time I get back, my Triumph is ready, with new oil but they couldn't replicate the squeak issue. However, they cleaned the brake pads for good measure. I always feel good after an oil change for any of our vehicles - it's probably just psychological, but it seems that the bike is running smoother. I guess it should for $130.

13 comments:

オテモヤン said...
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Mike said...

Lance,
That's a bummer about the cost on the oil change. Synthetic oil is more expensive but even for my car just the oil is about $45. If you're slightly mechanically inclined you might consider looking online to get all the info and do it yourself next time.

As far as the squeak, my bike does that most times I push it around too. With 3000 miles your brake pads are still relatively new so they tend to ride close to the calipers (disc) when not engaged. It's good that they checked the them though.

Thanks for the tour around Issaquah. It looks interesting. That restaurant sounds like a nice place. A vintage car show there would be cool.

Lance said...

Thanks Mike for your comments here. It is good to know that these things happen as the bike breaks in. It's been a wonderful experience with my Triumph.

Chuck Pefley said...

Lance, I wondered about that Shell station when I rode through Issaquah last Sunday on the way up to Snoqualmie Falls with my scooter group. Whoever was responsible sure did a nice job on it.

It's the same story with scooter oil changes, too. Boggles the mind and creates a lot of home mechanics when bikes move past factory warranty.

irondad said...

Interesting tour of the town. I went to veterinary school for a couple of years. I don't remember horses looking like that under the skin, though!

Geoff James said...

Hello from another Triumph owner!

Excellent posts and great photos in your blog. I'm a latecomer to blogging but its a wonderful way of staying in touch with fellow enthusiasts round the world.

Safe riding,

Geoff

New Zealand

Baron's Life said...

Congratulations on the milestone...3000 mile...the $100~$130.00 is a good investment. Whenever I buy a Bike, new or used, firstthing I do is get all the liquids changed immediately...that way I feel secure the job i done and the bike is safe.
Nice photographs and story..thank for sharing

travelswithmymotorbike said...

3000 all ready!!...your putting me to shame Lance.

A very quaint town, I like the old restored petrol station.....130 for an oil change WOW!!

Squeaky brakes are normal here, just a bit of grit, a tenth of the size of a grain of sand wedged in a pad can sound like bare metal on metal grinding.

Cheers,


Dave....

Jack Riepe said...

Dear Lance:

I feel your pain. I generally get an annual service for the K75 in which the oil, transmission oil, brake fluid, and coolant are changed, in addition to getting the spark plugs replaced and any other little odds and ends that need dealing with. The typical bill is around $1100.

This year, I will rely on the kind attention of friends to help me change the oil and transmission fluid, a process that takes less than an hour. The hardest part on this rig is dealing with the oil filter, which is buried under an inspection plate on the botton of the bike. I'll get another year out of the brake fluid and coolant.

Fortunately, the tires and brakes are new.

I do not begrudge the dealer or the mechanic getting the full value of their time, but it's hard to justify when I cannot get the full value for my time.

Spring is here. See you on the road.

Fondest regards,
Jack • reep • Toad
Twisted Roads

Jack Riepe said...

PS:

The town featured in this blog is amazing. I love it when thre character of a place is recognized for what it is and painstakingly preserved. I also think it was amazing that you could pull into the dealer, get the oil changed, and get out in an hour.

I have to make an appointment 2 months in advance.

Fondest regards,
Jack

Orin said...

Unfortunately, the reason places that work on cars are able to charge so much less for their services is volume. There are so many more cars and light trucks out there, and more importantly, so many more places that work on them. There are no less than half a dozen independent auto repair shops within a couple miles of my house, so that tends to keep prices down, too.

The modern Vespa owner is particularly stuck behind the 8-ball—there's not a whole lot the DIY guy or gal can work on without investing a lot of moolah in special tools and equipment...

__Orin
Scootin' Old Skool

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